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Friday, April 11

  1. msg www.gamestopcheats.blogspot.com message posted www.gamestopcheats.blogspot.com [url= http://www.gamestopcheats.blogspot.com ]cheats code[/url]
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    12:43 am

Monday, October 10

  1. page RemixCulture edited ... Lessig in conversation with The Booksmith on his book, REMIX Total Recut Everything Is A Re…
    ...
    Lessig in conversation with The Booksmith on his book, REMIX
    Total Recut
    Everything Is A Remix
    http://www.everythingisaremix.info/
    The blog about the web video series, "Everything is a Remix". Here's a sample:

    RIP: A Remix Manifesto
    http://www.ripremix.com
    The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manifesto_Antropófago|Manifesto Antropófago]] (Cannibal Manifesto in English) was published in 1928 by the Brazilian poet and polemicist Oswald de Andrade.
    Its argument is that Brazil's history of "cannibalizing" other cultures is its greatest strength, while playing on the modernists' primitivist interest in cannibalism as an alleged tribal rite. Cannibalism becomes a way for Brazil to assert itself against European post-colonial cultural domination. The Manifesto's iconic line is "Tupi or not Tupi: that is the question." The line is simultaneously a celebration of the Tupi, who practiced certain forms of ritual cannibalism (as detailed in the 16th century writings of Andre Thevet, Hans Staden, and Jean de Lery), and a metaphorical instance of cannibalism: it eats Shakespeare.

    (view changes)
    6:45 pm
  2. page Game Mechanics edited ... Why Twitter is addictive Variable interval schedule of reinforcement, similar to how a jackpo…
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    Why Twitter is addictive
    Variable interval schedule of reinforcement, similar to how a jackpot machine gets us hooked. In other words, you can never truly predict when the next interesting tweet is about to arrive. From decades of empirical research, we know that behaviour that is randomly reinforced is very difficult toextinguish. This underlies – some would go so far as say to ‘explain’ – problematic gambling behaviour. Think of a fruit machine: You’ve got to keep feeding the slot with money because maybe, just maybe, the sweet reinforcement of a jackpot is around the corner. Source: http://ianhocking.com/2009/03/03/the-psychology-of-twitter-jackpot/
    Going into variable intervals, we have...
    The Grind Mystery: Escalating Reward Schedules
    http://blog.ihobo.com/2011/01/the-grind-mystery-escalating-reward-schedules.html
    I’ve written before about reward schedules in games (also known as schedules of reinforcement in the psychology literature), and as many will know these are considered for the most part to have four basic kinds: fixed ratio, variable ratio, fixed interval and variable interval. (If you are unfamiliar with these terms, please follow the previous link for an explanation, given in the second set of bullet points). In the past, I’ve suggested that the levelling mechanics from RPGs (now present in a growing majority of blockbuster commercial games) can be understood as a fixed ratio schedule. But this overlooks an important question. If, as psychologists maintain, these four schedules are the basic effective forms of operant conditioning (that is, training for behaviour), why is it that the RPG levelling structure – which originated with Dungeons & Dragons – doesn’t use a fixed ratio at all, but in fact a ratio that gradually increases over iterations? For instance, a typical D&D experience point curve goes 0, 1000, 3000, 6000, 10000, 15000, 21000 etc. Let’s call this an escalating ratio schedule for convenience, or an escalating reward schedule. If psychologists are correct that the four basic schedules listed above are essentially fundamental, it seems quite anomalous that games (which are the example par excellence of reward schedules in action) should prefer an escalating schedule, and equally queer that the academic paperwork seems (as far as I have been able to ascertain) to completely overlook this form as significant.

    Also see why variable interval is so powerful...
    Dopamine Jackpot! Sapolsky on the Science of... by FORAtv
    What reward does your brain actually seek?
    http://boingboing.net/2011/10/10/what-reward-does-your-brain-actually-seek.html
    Dopamine does a lot of things, but you're probably most familiar with it as the chemical your brain uses as a sort-of system of in-game gold coins. You earn the reward for certain behaviors, usually "lizard-brain" type stuff—eating a bowl of pudding, for instance, or finally making out with that cute person you've had your eye on. And, as you've probably heard, there's some evidence that we can get addicted to that burst of dopamine, and that's how a nice dessert or an enjoyable crush turns into something like compulsive eating or sex addiction. Neurologist Robert Sapolsky puts an interesting twist on this old story, though. What if it isn't the burst of dopamine that we get addicted to, but the anticipation of a burst of dopamine? It's a small distinction. But it matters, he says, if our reward system is based less on happiness than on the pursuit of happiness. For more on this, check out David Bradley's post on this video, which also links back to a more-detailed discussion of the basics of dopamine addiction.
    (view changes)
    7:20 am
  3. page Game Mechanics edited ... THEORY Unlocking the Psychology of Achievements (9th Sept 2008) http://www.gamecyte.com/unlo…
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    THEORY
    Unlocking the Psychology of Achievements (9th Sept 2008)
    http://www.gamecyte.com/unlocking-the-psychology-of-achievements (alt source: http://www.ps3informer.com/playstation-3/games/the-psychology-of-achievements-010148.php)
    Based on personal experience, completionists need goals to achieve and do not enjoy open-ended game experiences. The only way that a completionist may enjoy such an experience is if they construct their own goals (i.e. maintain the top score on high score list).
    {http://www.gamecyte.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/activision-patches.jpg}
    ...
    Here's the key point which Mathias feels Jesse missed out when he discussed persuasive ends...
    Ends vs. Means
    "thehttp://www.iftf.org/node/3384
    "the
    tools of
    ...
    desirable means." (Bogost, 16)Source: Bogost, Ian. "Fine Processing." PERSUASIVE 2008. H. Oinas-Kukkonen et al. (Eds.) LNCS 5033, 2008. pp 13-22
    It's wonderful. For instance, students perceive education as system to get grades, but with this notion, they can be channeled to think of broader alternatives to get better grades. Educators will have to redesign their approach to teaching to take advantage of this.
    Why Twitter is addictive
    Variable interval schedule of reinforcement, similar to how a jackpot machine gets us hooked. In other words, you can never truly predict when the next interesting tweet is about to arrive. From decades of empirical research, we know that behaviour that is randomly reinforced is very difficult toextinguish. This underlies – some would go so far as say to ‘explain’ – problematic gambling behaviour. Think of a fruit machine: You’ve got to keep feeding the slot with money because maybe, just maybe, the sweet reinforcement of a jackpot is around the corner. Source: http://ianhocking.com/2009/03/03/the-psychology-of-twitter-jackpot/
    Also see why variable interval is so powerful...
    Dopamine Jackpot! Sapolsky on the Science of... by FORAtv
    http://boingboing.net/2011/10/10/what-reward-does-your-brain-actually-seek.html
    Dopamine does a lot of things, but you're probably most familiar with it as the chemical your brain uses as a sort-of system of in-game gold coins. You earn the reward for certain behaviors, usually "lizard-brain" type stuff—eating a bowl of pudding, for instance, or finally making out with that cute person you've had your eye on. And, as you've probably heard, there's some evidence that we can get addicted to that burst of dopamine, and that's how a nice dessert or an enjoyable crush turns into something like compulsive eating or sex addiction. Neurologist Robert Sapolsky puts an interesting twist on this old story, though. What if it isn't the burst of dopamine that we get addicted to, but the anticipation of a burst of dopamine? It's a small distinction. But it matters, he says, if our reward system is based less on happiness than on the pursuit of happiness. For more on this, check out David Bradley's post on this video, which also links back to a more-detailed discussion of the basics of dopamine addiction.

    CONCEPTS
    Crossmedia (also known as Cross-Media, Cross-Media Entertainment, Cross-Media Communication) is a media property owned , service, story or experience distributed across media platforms using a variety of media forms. It refers to the journey or linkages across devices and through forms and is most evident in branded entertainment, advertising, games and quest based forms such as Alternate Reality Games where there are a range of dependencies between the media placed across devices and fragments there-of.
    ...
    Stanford Media X
    http://mediax.stanford.edu

    (view changes)
    7:14 am

Monday, February 28

  1. msg How do you replace the picture at the top right corner? message posted How do you replace the picture at the top right corner? idk
    How do you replace the picture at the top right corner?
    idk
    3:27 pm

Monday, May 24

  1. page Game Mechanics edited ... Co-creation is the practice of product or service development that is collaboratively executed…
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    Co-creation is the practice of product or service development that is collaboratively executed by developers and stakeholders together. Isaac Newton said that in his great work, he stood on the shoulders of giants. Co-creation could be seen as creating great work by standing together with those for whom the project is intended.
    SHOWCASE
    Games For Change
    http://www.gamesforchange.org/
    {http://www.gamesforchange.org/images/logotype.jpg}
    Games for Change provides support, visibility and shared resources to individuals and organizations using and designing digital games for social change. This is the primary community of practice and international nexus for those interested in making digital games about the most pressing issues of our day—from race to poverty to the environment. Members represent hundreds of organizations and include partners in the games industry, academia, nonprofit sector, local and state governments, foundations, the United Nations, and the arts. Founded in 2004, Games for Change acts as a knowledge base and resource hub to help organizations network and develop video game projects beyond their traditional expertise, and provides special assistance to foundations and nonprofits entering the field.

    {https://www.armrev.org/images/future_forward_banner.gif?1270618064}
    Online social games such as FarmVille andHappy Island let players tend make-believe homesteads and islands. A new online site wants to take such social gaming tasks into the real world.
    (view changes)
    6:04 pm

Monday, May 10

  1. page Museumism edited ... Museum-ism Exploring the future of museums Audience Research Unit http://australianmuseum.…
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    Museum-ism
    Exploring the future of museums
    Audience Research Unit
    http://australianmuseum.net.au/Audience-Research/
    The Australian Museum Audience Research Unit undertakes a broad range of visitor research and evaluation projects. The objectives of the unit are to undertake and facilitate innovative research into visitor experiences and learning issues in museums generally; feed information into program development, policy and planning; publicise and disseminate research results and serve as a networking hub linking the Museum with other organisations, universities and research institutions that are undertaking research in complementary areas.

    Personalities
    Prof. Alex Halavais
    (view changes)
    9:09 pm
  2. page Abbreviations edited ... Abbreviations Working in Singapore means encountering tons of abbreviations. Here are some of…
    ...
    Abbreviations
    Working in Singapore means encountering tons of abbreviations. Here are some of the commonly used terms.
    Biennale
    Italian for "every other year" and can be used to describe any event that happens every two years. It is commonly used within the art world to describe an international manifestation of contemporary art (for example, the "Biennale de Paris" which was created in 1959 by André Malraux). The word is spelled identically (biennale) in French. English speakers sometimes use the equivalent English word, biennial (for example, the "Venice Biennial") in speaking or writing of such events. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biennale

    TOR
    Terms of Reference
    (view changes)
    6:44 pm
  3. page Abbreviations edited Abbreviations Working in Singapore means encountering tons of abbreviations. Here are some of t…

    Abbreviations
    Working in Singapore means encountering tons of abbreviations. Here are some of the commonly used terms.
    TOR
    Terms of Reference

    (view changes)
    6:08 pm

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