Robert Pratten's Transmedia in Pictures. A transmedia project ought to design the embodiment of the storyworld into each media in a synergistic way. Most franchises don't and this leads to an unsatisfying whole.
Robert Pratten's Transmedia in Pictures. A transmedia project ought to design the embodiment of the storyworld into each media in a synergistic way. Most franchises don't and this leads to an unsatisfying whole.

Transmedia Storytelling

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmedia_storytelling

In Transmedia storytelling, content becomes invasive and permeates fully the audience's lifestyle. A transmedia project develops storytelling across multiple forms of media in order to have different "entry points" in the story; entry-points with a unique and independent lifespan but with a definite role in the big narrative scheme.[1] One of the first documented uses of the term comes from Henry Jenkins in his 2003 MIT Technology Review article, "Transmedia Storytelling," where he argues via analysis of past entertainment franchises that the coordinated use of storytelling across platforms can make the characters more compelling. [2] Stephen Dinehart, created the termtransmedial play and the VUP (viewer/user/player) in his 2006 MFA thesis paper "Transmedial Play" where he relates this model to Richard Wagner and his concept of "total artwork" ("Gesamtkunstwerk") where the spectator becomes actor/player.[3] Dinehart goes on to suggest that unlike crossmedia projects of the past, in which IP crosses the media divide for purely product line diversification (merchandising), true transmedia is designed with intent in pre-production, rather than simply rehashing IP in post for maximum exploitation and ROI.[4]

A powerful means of engagement through transmedia storytelling would be through the integration of alternate reality games (ARG)

Alternate Reality Game (ARG)

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alternate_reality_game

An alternate reality game (ARG) is an interactive narrative that uses the real world as a platform, often involving multiple media and game elements, to tell a story that may be affected by participants' ideas or actions. The form is defined by intense player involvement with a story that takes place in real-time and evolves according to participants' responses, and characters that are actively controlled by the game's designers, as opposed to being controlled by artificial intelligence as in a computer or console video game. Players interact directly with characters in the game, solve plot-based challenges and puzzles, and often work together with a community to analyze the story and coordinate real-life and online activities. ARGs generally use multimedia, such as telephones, email and mail but rely on the Internet as the central binding medium.



Practitioners


Christy Dena
Christy Dena
Christy Dena
http://www.christydena.com
Christy Dena is a cross-media specialist who works as a narrative and game design consultant, strategist, educator and developer. Christy has taught digital games, pervasive games, alternate reality games, cross-media, hypertext fiction, blog fiction, bot fiction, mobile fiction design and theory to institutions in UK, The Netherlands and across Australia.




Jane McGonigal
Jane McGonigal
Jane McGonigal

http://avantgame.com
I'm a game designer, a games researcher, and a future forecaster. I make games that give a damn. I study how games change lives. I spend a lot of my time figuring out how the games we play today shape our real-world future. And so I'm trying to make sure that a game developer wins a Nobel Prize by the year 2032. Learn more here in my bio or get my contact information on my contact page.




Henry Jenkins
Henry Jenkins
Henry Jenkins
http://www.henryjenkins.org
Jenkins' research has been focused on the concept of "Media Convergence", arguing that the simple technological-focused view that was once hyped was short sighted and that an understanding of how individuals in contemporary culture themselves tap into and combine numerous different media sources offers a far richer understanding of the relationship between different media forms. In this respect, he suggests that convergence be understood as a cultural process, rather than a technological end-point. According to Jenkins, there are nine sites where important negotiations between consumers and producers are occurring. These sites are revising audience measurement, remapping globalization, reengaging citizens, renegotiating relations between producers and consumers, redesigning the digital economy, rethinking media aesthetics, regulating media content, redefining intellectual property rights and restricting media ownership. This research led to his 2006 book Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide and the founding of the Convergence Culture Consortium research group at the Comparative Media Studies program at MIT.





Resources


Content management and delivery tools for indie ARG producers, by Jeff Watson (Feb 2010)
http://remotedevice.net/blog/arg-tools/



Showcase


external image mysterious-thumb-drive.jpg

http://www.gknova6.com

(Unknown ARG: Suspecting Fallout or Call of Duty)

Joystiq: ARG, we can't believe we wasted time on that
http://www.joystiq.com/2010/04/05/arg-we-cant-believe-we-wasted-time-on-that/
"Today, we received an unmarked USB storage device in a mysterious, unmarked envelope. The drive held a simple text file, with the following words: Cryptography; Isotope; Philanthropy; Hydrogen; Ember; Rebirth. Oh, this one's easy! Cryptography; Isotope; Philanthropy; Hydrogen; Ember; Rebirth. Cipher! But for what? [...] An audio file embedded on the same drive offered only some electronic voices, a sequence of letters and numbers read by a female voice -- M O D [sound of 3 chimes] Z Z Z J N Q R Y D 3 F R P -- and some words spoken by a man: "What we wish, we readily believe, and what we ourselves think, we imagine others think also," followed by, "Don't believe everything you see.""

Kotaku: Mystery Mailings Point To Radioactive TV Channel, Call of Duty Clues?
http://kotaku.com/5510728/mystery-mailings-point-to-radioactive-tv-channel-call-of-duty-clues

MovieViral: GKNOVA6: Viral Site For Unknown Video Game Discovered – Fallout or Call of Duty?
http://www.movieviral.com/2010/04/05/gknova6-viral-site-for-unknown-game/